MBBS Curriculum 2020

Events

2017 Annual Sowerby Lecture
9 November 2017 - 19:30-21:00

Mental Health and Justice: Classical and Romantic perspectives

Lecture: Gareth Owen – King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience

 
Abstract:

Psychiatry has long attracted interpretations from cool, detached perspectives valuing objectivity (Kraepelin, Freud, Beck) to hotter, embodied perspectives valuing subjectivity (Reil, Laing, Foucault).

These two perspectives (‘classical’ and ‘romantic’) are now expressing themselves in psychiatry’s meeting point with law with different approaches taken to the decision-making of the mentally ill. A recent ‘classical’ achievement in this area is the Mental Capacity Act (2005) which lays out a test of decision-making capacity within a legal framework that has been described as “a masterpiece of legal clarity”. A recent romantic achievement has been the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which emphatically asserts a social model of mental illness in which society, not the brain, is the true source of disabilities.

This lecture will probe the subjectivity of some disorders of mind and brain. What, for example, is it like to be a decision-maker under conditions of brain injury unaware of one’s deficits or a person with affective disorder fluctuating between experiences of the future as intensely dark and intensely bright? And how should others respond? It aims to use these forms of human experience to challenge the single mindedness of both classical and romantic perspectives and draw out implications for psychiatry as a branch of medicine interacting with law and society.

 
About the Speaker:

Dr Gareth Owen leads the Wellcome Trust funded Mental Health and Justice Project – a collaborative research endeavour spanning psychiatry, law, ethics, neuroscience and social science/public policy. The project takes an interdisciplinary approach to the core dilemma of respecting vs. protecting the decision-making of people with mental disabilities or disorders. He did undergrad studies in physics, philosophy and medicine and post grad psychiatry training at the Maudsley.
 




Past Events



Placebo-Controlled Surgical Trials
1 October 2015 - 18:30-20:00

Lecture: David Beard, Professor of Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford
Comment: David Papineau, Professor of Philosophy, King’s College London

K2.31, King’s Building, Strand, King’s College London

(See this event also on Facebook)

See Poster Video Recording


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
2 October 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

Murphy, Dominic (2008). “Concepts of health and disease”. In Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ed. Edward N. Zalta. California: Metaphysics Research Lab, CSLI, Stanford University. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/health-disease

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
9 October 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Readings:

  1. Nunn, Robin (2009). “It’s time to put the placebo out of our misery”. British Medical Journal 338, b1568. http://www.bmj.com/content/338/bmj.b1568
  2. Nunn, Robin (2009). “Preparing for a post-placebo paradigm: ethics and choice of control in clinical trials”. American Journal of Bioethics 9, p. 51-52.  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15265160903093854
  3. Turner, Andrew (2012). “’Placebos’ and the logic of placebo comparison”. Biology & Philosophy 27, p. 419-432. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10539-011-9289-8

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Lies, Damn’d Lies, and Statistics: Is it possible to communicate cancer risk accurately?
15 October 2015 - 18:30-20:00

Lecture: Steve John, Lecturer, History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge
Comment: Deborah Ruddy, Consultant in Clinical Genetics, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital

Henriette Raphael House, Function Room, Guy’s Campus

(See this event also on Facebook)

Abstract:

 

The fact that different ways of presenting the same risk information can have very different effects on patients’ choices raises an ethical challenge: how, if at all, should medical professionals use such “perlocutionary knowledge”? In this paper, I suggest that reflection on the nature of risk estimates poses an even harder problem: which reference classes should physicians use to calculate patients’ risks in the first place? I then sketch one answer to this challenge, based on an account of rational gambling. Unfortunately, this answer seems to conflict with much current medical practice. In the final part of the paper, I try to justify current practice. I conclude with some remarks on the implications of my argument both for clinical ethics and for the philosophy of science.

Abstract
See Poster Video Recording


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
16 October 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

  1. Shapiro, Arthur K. (1960). “A contribution to a history of the placebo effect”. Systems Research and Behavioral Science 5, p. 109–135. (link)
  2. Craen, Anton J. de & al. (1999). “Placebos and placebo effects in medicine: historical overview”. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 92, p. 511–515. (link)
  3. Jütte, Robert (2013). “The early history of the placebo”. Complementary Therapies in Medicine 21, p. 94–97. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
23 October 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

  1. Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn (2002). “What are the main methodological problems in the estimation of placebo effects?”. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 55, p. 430–435. (link)
  2. Shorter, Edward (2011). “A brief history of placebos and clinical trials in psychiatry”. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 56, p. 193–197. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Surviving the Sirens: Should there be advance directives for people with Bipolar? -- CANCELLED
29 October 2015 - 18:30-20:00

Lecture: Tania Gergel, Visiting Research Fellow in Ancient Philosophy (Dept. of Classics) and Philosophy of Psychiatry (IoPPN)
Comment: Alexander Ruck Keene, Barrister and Honorary Research Lecturer at the University of Manchester

This event has been cancelled due to illness. It will be rescheduled for a later date.


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
30 October 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

  1. Hoffman, Ginger A. & al. (2005). “Pain and the placebo: what we have learned?”. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48, p. 248-265. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
6 November 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

Benedetti, Fabrizio (2008). “Mechanisms of placebo and placebo-related effects across diseases and treatments”. Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology 48, p. 33-60. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


”Just because I’m paranoid doesn’t mean they’re not out to get me”: The Problem of Defining Delusion
12 November 2015 - 18:30-20:00

Lecture: Dr. Abdi Sanati, Consultant Inpatient Psychiatrist, North East London NHS Foundation Trust
Comment: Dr. Luis Flores, MD, MA, MPhil

King’s Building, K2.31, Strand

(See this event also on Facebook)

Abstract:

 

Delusions have long been seen as a hallmark of madness, but what makes something a delusion? People have mistaken beliefs without being called deluded, and the beliefs of deluded people can be true. In this talk, these and other difficulties with defining delusion will be explored from the points of view of both theory and clinical practice.

Abstract Video Recording


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
13 November 2015 - 16:00-17:30

No meeting.


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
20 November 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

Jacob Stegenga (2015). “Effectiveness of medical interventions”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 54, 34–44. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Annual Sowerby Lecture -- All Welcome
26 November 2015 - 18:30-20:00

“If I had to live like you, I think I’d kill myself”: Explaining the Disability Paradox

Lecture: Havi Carel, Professor of Philosophy, University of Bristol
Comment: Brian Hurwitz, Professor of Medicine and the Arts, King’s College London
 
(See this event also on Facebook)

Abstract:

 

The ‘disability paradox’ identifies a significant difference in how ill and disabled people rate their wellbeing, compared with healthy people asked to imagine how happy they would be if they were unwell. Ill and disabled people’s wellbeing rating is only slightly lower than that of healthy people. However, healthy people rate their hypothetical wellbeing as much lower when asked to imagine themselves as ‘hypothetical patients’. There are three possible explanations: either patients misreport their wellbeing due to adaptation, or healthy people mis-imagine ill-health, or both.

 

In this paper I examine these explanations and suggest that it is healthy people who misimagine ill-health. I also claim that it is impossible to claim that ill people are misreporting their wellbeing due to adaptaion without this having general consequences for any subjective wellbeing measurements. I also claim that the phenomenon of adaptation to illness raises important questions for health economics, and that the psycho-social mechanisms involved in adaptation can be illuminated by a phenomenological analysis.

Abstract
Video Recording


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
27 November 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

Christian Perring (2010). “Mental illness”. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ed. Edward N. Zalta. California: Metaphysics Research Lab, CSLI, Stanford University. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
4 December 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

Kendler K.S., Zachar P. & Craver C. (2011). “What kinds of things are psychiatric disorders?”. Psychological Medicine 41, p. 1143-1150. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Reading Group: Medicine and the Mind
11 December 2015 - 16:00-17:30

Reading:

Howick, Jeremy (2011). “Exposing the vanities – and a qualified defense – of mechanistic reasoning in health care decision making”. Philosophy of Science 78, p. 926-940. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

S-1.04, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Cause or Correlation? Causal Evidence in Medicine and Law
28 January 2016 - 18:30-20:00

Lecture: Brendan Clarke, Department of Science and Technology Studies, UCL
Comment: Nicki Cohen, Neuropathologist, GKT Department of Medical Education, KCL

Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus

(See this event also on Facebook)

Abstract:

 

How can medical researchers generate reliable knowledge about treatment outcomes? The usual answer to this question is that randomised clinical trials are the best way of doing this. But there are many cases where doing a trial is not possible. In such cases, researchers must rely on other kinds of evidence. However, as is well-known, these kinds of evidence have many shortcomings, such as suffering from confounding and various species of bias. This talk uses methods drawn from the law to explore improved ways of working with imperfect evidence in medicine.

Abstract Video Recording


In Defense of the Social Value Requirement for Clinical Research
11 February 2016 - 18:30-20:00

Lecture: Annette Rid, Department of Social Science, Health, and Medicine, KCL
Comment: Benedict Rumbold, Department of Philosophy, UCL

Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus

(See this event also on Facebook)

Abstract:

 

Many commentators and guidelines endorse the view that clinical research should be permitted only when it is socially valuable, meaning that it collects data which can be used to improve health. Despite this widespread endorsement and codification, there has been no systematic analysis of why social value is a necessary condition on acceptable clinical research, and a recent article even suggests it is not necessary. I evaluate the relevant ethical arguments and policy considerations and provide justification for the view that social value is an ethical requirement for the vast majority of clinical research trials, and should be mandated by guidelines and policies for clinical research.

Abstract


Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
12 February 2016 - 16:00-18:00

Reading:

Scholl, Raphael (2013). “Causal inference, mechanisms, and the Semmelweis case”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44, p. 66–76. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
19 February 2016 - 16:00-18:00

Reading:

Russo, Frederica & Williamson, Jon (2007). “Interpreting causality in the health sciences”. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21, p. 157–170. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 


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