MBBS Curriculum 2020

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  • Past Events



    Configuring the Participants in Clinical Research
    25 February 2016 - 18:30-20:00

    Lecture: Norma Morris, Department of Science and Technology Studies, UCL
    Comment: John Craven, Philosophy, KCL

    K2.31, King’s Building, Strand, King’s College London

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Abstract:

     

    Empirical work on participation in clinical research (using qualitative methods) has highlighted some of the configuration work being carried out by and on those taking part. Lay contributors try out different identities and behaviours, and develop conceptions of their role in response to circumstances. Clinical staff have to reconcile the professional demands of research and of care, and adjust as necessary their pre-formed expectations of participants’ needs. They must additionally comply with professional, legal, ethical and governance frameworks and rules. The presentation discusses tensions emerging for the actors, meeting at the confluence of these three streams, in the performance of clinical research.

    Abstract


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    26 February 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Dragulinescu, Stefan (2012). “On ‘Stabilising’ medical mechanisms, truth-makers and epistemic causality: a critique to Williamson and Russo’s approach”. Synthese 187, p. 785-800. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    4 March 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Cartwright, Nancy & Munro, Eileen (2010). “The limitations of randomized controlled trials in predicting effectiveness”. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, p. 260–266. (link)

    Hubbeling, Dieneke (2012). “The application of Cartwright’s concept of capacities to complex interventions in psychiatry”. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18, p. 1013–1018. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Pain: survival, science and suffering
    10 March 2016 - 18:30-20:00

    Lecture: Emma Briggs, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, KCL
    Comment: Shawn Vigil, Philosophy, KCL

    K2.31, King’s Building, Strand, King’s College London

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Abstract:

     

    Our understanding of the nature, mechanisms and meaning of pain has evolved significantly over the last century but its complexity still presents many clinical, ethical and philosophical challenges. Pain is widespread; a universal human experience and the most frequent reason people seek healthcare. Pain has a demonstrable impact on the individual, the family and health and social care systems. This presentation sets the scene for the discussion by exploring the impact and role of pain and the unpredictable relationship between the science and suffering.

    Abstract


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    11 March 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Russo, Federica & Williamson, Jon (2012). “EnviroGenomarkers: the interplay between mechanisms and difference making in establishing causal claims”. Medicine Studies 3, p. 249–262. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    18 March 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Attending the “50 Years of Worrall: Science, Structure and Rock ‘n’ Roll” conference: http://www.lse.ac.uk/philosophy/blog/2016/03/11/50-years-of-worrall-science-structure-and-rock-n-roll/

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    25 March 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    No meeting.


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    8 April 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Ashcroft, Richard (2002). “What is clinical effectiveness?”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33, p. 219-233. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    15 April 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    No meeting.


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    22 April 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Stegenga, Jacob (2014). “Down with the hierarchies”. Topoi 33, p. 313-322. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    29 April 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Solomon, Miriam (2011). “Just a paradigm: evidence-based medicine in epistemological context”. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1, p. 451-466. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Symposium: Self-Knowledge in and out of Illness -- Video links below
    3 May 2016 - 4 May 2016 - 09:00-17:30

    Self-knowledge has always played a role in health care since a person needs to be able to accurately assess her body or behaviour in order to determine whether to seek medical help. But more recently it has come to play a larger role, as health care has moved from a more paternalistic model to one where the patient is expected to take charge of her health; as we realized that early detection, and hence self-examination, can play a crucial role in outcomes; as medical science improves and makes more terminal illnesses into chronic conditions requiring self-management; as genetic testing makes it possible to have more information about our futures; and with the advent of personal electronic devices that make it easy for a person to gather accurate real-time information about her body.

    It can be hard to get good information about oneself, and even harder to know what to do it. Sometimes self-knowledge is needed for a good outcome, but sometimes it is useless, or worse. Breast self-examination can lead to over-treatment, learning that one has a predisposing gene can create a detrimental illusion of knowing more about the future than one does, and data about one’s vital signs can be meaningless if taken out of a context of interpretation. We look at how these and other issues play out in a variety of medical contexts.

    In conjunction with the Symposium, the Palgrave Communications journal will publish a special issue based on the same topic. More details and the Call for Papers can be found at: http://philosophyandmedicine.org/call-for-papers-self-knowledge//

    (See this event also on Facebook)
     

    Programme

    Abstracts PDF

    3 May – Greenwood Lecture Theatre

    Morning: 9:00-12:30
     

    Welcome: Stuart Carney, Dean of the GKT School of Medical Education
     
    Introduction: Sherri Roush, Peter Sowerby Chair in Philosophy and Medicine (Video)
     

    Chair: Gareth Owen, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King’s College London

    Tony David, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King’s College London

    Self-Reflection in illness and health – literal and metaphorical? (Video)

    Nick Shea, Department of Philosophy, King’s College London

    Metacognition for acting and deciding together (Video)

    Fiona Johnson, University College London

    Self-Perception of Weight: Is a little knowledge a dangerous thing? (Video)

    Matthew Hotopf, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King’s College London

    Big data, Big Brother and the internet of things: the challenges of implementing mobile health (Video)

     

    Afternoon: 2:30-5:30 – followed by reception
     

    Chair: Sherri Roush, King’s College London

    Fiona Cowdell and Judith Dyson, University of Hull

    Skin Self-examination (Video)

    Quassim Cassam, Department of Philosophy, University of Warwick

    Self-knowledge in Diagnosis and Self-Diagnosis (handout) (Video)

    Paul Norman, University of Sheffield

    Psychological aspects of Breast Self-examination (Video)

     
    Reception: 5:30
     
     
     

    4 May 2016 – Harris Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building

    Morning: 9:00 – 12:00
     

    Introduction: Simon Howell, Dean of Biomedical Sciences
     

    Chair: Abdi Sanati, Consultant Inpatient Psychiatrist, North East London NHS Foundation Trust

    Christine Patch, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals

    Genetic Testing and Screening: tales from the real world (Video)

    Sherri Roush, Department of Philosophy, King’s College London

    Hypochondria and self-recalibration (Video)

    Sacha Golob, Department of Philosophy, King’s College London

    Self-Cultivation and Self-Knowing: Knowledge as Style (Video)

     

    Afternoon: 2:00-5:00
     

    Chair: Sacha Golob, Department of Philosophy, KCL

    Veronika Williams, University of Oxford

    “I just know” – experiences of self-managing acute exacerbations in COPD (Video)

    Havi Carel, University of Bristol

    What kind of knowledge can illness promote? (Video)

    Tim Holt, University of Oxford

    Sailing close to the wind: models and metaphors for the self-management of diabetes (Video)

     

    See Poster See Poster B&W
     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    6 May 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Solomon, Miriam (2015). “What is translational medicine?”. Chapter 7 of Making Medical Knowledge (OUP). (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    13 May 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Fiorentinoa, Alexander R. & Dammann, Olaf (2015). “Evidence, illness, and causation: an epidemiological perspective on the Russo–Williamson Thesis”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 54, p. 1-9. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    20 May 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    Broadbent, Alex (2011). “Inferring causation in epidemiology: mechanisms, black boxes, and contrasts”. In Causality in the Sciences, ed. P. Illari, F. Russo & J. Williamson. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    E1 North Wing, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Medicine and the Mind. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Philosophy and Medicine
    27 May 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    No meeting.


    Mortality
    29 September 2016 - 16:30-18:00

    LectureDavid Galloway, KCL Philosophy

    Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus

    Abstract:

    Would it be a good thing for us if we were able to lengthen our lives indefinitely, in excellent physical health? Or would we all, even in the most favourable circumstances, choose eventually to die? If we would so choose, then our mortality is not in itself a bad thing, and immortality is not to be desired. I will discuss factors we might consider in making this choice.

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Essay Contest
    Reading Group Video Recording


    Reading Group: Death and Mortality
    6 October 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Reading:

    The following readings will anchor our discussion, in this order, and we’ll see how far we get each time. The papers can be found online, but the first one takes some digging.

    Reading beforehand is not required. Feel free to come as you are.

    • Bernard Williams, ‘The Makropulos Case: reflections on the tedium of immortality’
    • Bernard Williams, ‘Unbearable suffering’, in his The Sense of the Past.
    • Ben Bradley, ‘Existential terror’, Journal of Ethics 19 (2015)
    • Adrian Moore, ‘Williams, Nietzsche and the meaninglessness of immortality’, Mind 115 April 2006
    • Galen Strawson, ‘Against narrativity’, in Ratio XVII 4 (December 2004)
    • Samuel Scheffler, Death and the Afterlife
    • Susan Woolf, Meaning in Life

    Convenor: Dr David Galloway

    K-1.56, Strand Building, Strand, King’s College London

    (See this event also on Facebook)


    Were you a part of your mother? The Metaphysics of Pregnancy
    13 October 2016 - 16:30-18:00

    LectureElselijn Kingma, Department of Philosophy, University of Southampton
    Comment: Dr. Shree Datta, Consultant Obstetrician and Gynecologist, King’s College Hospital

    New Hunt’s House, G.12, Guy’s Campus

    Abstract:

    What is the metaphysical relationship between the gestating organism and its embryo/fetus? I compare two views: (1) the fetal container model: the fetus is not part of but merely contained within or surrounded by the gestating organism; (2) the part-whole model: the fetus is part of its gestator. The fetal container model appears to be the received view. It is widely assumed but, I argue, without good argument; this model needs substantial support if it is to be taken seriously. The part-whole model is not presently defended, but I argue that it derives considerable support from a range of biological and physiological considerations. I conclude that the part-whole model has the upper hand and that, if true, this has important consequences for the metaphysics of persons and organisms and, perhaps, ethics and law.

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Video Recording


    Reading Group: Death and Mortality
    20 October 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Convenor: Dr David Galloway

    K-1.56, King’s Building, Strand, King’s College London

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Reading:

    The following readings will anchor our discussion, in this order, and we’ll see how far we get each time. The papers can be found online, but the first one takes some digging.

    Reading beforehand is not required. Feel free to come as you are.

    • Bernard Williams, ‘The Makropulos Case: reflections on the tedium of immortality’
    • Bernard Williams, ‘Unbearable suffering’, in his The Sense of the Past.
    • Ben Bradley, ‘Existential terror’, Journal of Ethics 19 (2015)
    • Adrian Moore, ‘Williams, Nietzsche and the meaninglessness of immortality’, Mind 115 April 2006
    • Galen Strawson, ‘Against narrativity’, in Ratio XVII 4 (December 2004)
    • Samuel Scheffler, Death and the Afterlife
    • Susan Woolf, Meaning in Life

     

    After-event Film Screening

    “Highlander”

    6:30pm – 405 Philosophy Building
     
     


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