MBBS Curriculum 2020

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  • Past Events



    Delusional Reasoning
    27 October 2016 - 16:30-18:00

    LectureMatthew Parrott, KCL Philosophy

    King’s Building, K-1.56, Strand Campus

    Abstract:

    In psychiatric textbooks and diagnostic manuals delusions are typically characterized in terms of impaired reasoning or as manifestations of irrationality. Yet it remains unclear what precisely is irrational about delusional patterns of thinking. In this presentation, we will examine several styles of reasoning exhibited in cases of delusion, some of which, as we shall see, appear surprisingly rational. This suggests, I shall claim, that delusional cognition is far more nuanced than standard textbooks and manuals might lead us to believe.

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Video Recording


    Essay contest reminder
    31 October 2016 - 00:00-00:00

    2016 SOWERBY ESSAY CONTEST – deadline in 1 week.


    Surviving the Sirens: Should there be advance directives for people with bipolar?
    10 November 2016 - 17:00-18:30

    LectureTania Gergel, IoPPN
    Comment: Alex Ruck Keene, Barrister

    New Hunt’s House, Lecture Theatre 2, Guy’s Campus

    Abstract:

    Bipolar Affective Disorder is a cyclical condition, with periods of remission and periods of illness, which often involve loss of decision-making capacity and damaging behaviour. For people with Bipolar, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), which commits them to treatment during future episodes, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational solution for an imperfect predicament. Nevertheless, efforts to establish a provision for SBDs are hampered by valid, but also paralysing, ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Paradoxically, the rights of people with Bipolar are being ‘protected’ through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. We will present and discuss a model of an SBD which could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination.

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Video Recording


    Reading Group: Death and Mortality
    17 November 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Convenor: Dr David Galloway

    K-1.56, King’s Building, Strand, King’s College London

    (See this event also on Facebook)
     

    Film Screening

    “Children of Men”
     


    2016 Annual Sowerby Lecture
    24 November 2016 - 19:30-21:00

    Medical Nihilism: Should we trust medical research?

    Lecture: Jacob Stegenga – University of Cambridge History and Philosophy of Science
    Comment: Richard Smith, former editor of the British Medical Journal

    Abstract:

    Many prominent physicians and journalists have expressed arguments supporting medical nihilism, which is the view that we should have little confidence in the effectiveness of novel medical interventions. In this talk I assess the case for medical nihilism. Salient arguments are based on the frequency of failed medical interventions, the extent of misleading and discordant evidence in clinical research, the sketchy theoretical framework on which many medical interventions are based, and the malleability of even the very best empirical methods employed in clinical research. To evaluate medical nihilism with care I articulate the general argument in formal terms. If we attend more broadly to our evidence, malleable methods, and background theories, and reason with our best inductive framework, then I argue that our confidence in the effectiveness of most medical interventions ought to be low.

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Video Recording


    Reading Group: Death and Mortality
    1 December 2016 - 16:00-18:00

    Convenor: Dr David Galloway

    K-1.56, King’s Building, Strand, King’s College London

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Reading:

    • Samuel Scheffler, Death and the Afterlife

     
     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    20 January 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    Maung, Hane (2016). “Diagnosis and causal explanation in psychiatry”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences. 60, p. 15-24. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    What's wrong with pragmatic trials?
    26 January 2017 - 17:00-18:30

    LectureNancy Cartwright, University of Durham and University of California, San Diego (Work with Sarah Wieten)

    Video Recording

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    Abstract:

    In principle nothing is wrong with pragmatic trials: trials that ‘seek to determine the effectiveness of an intervention in a real-world setting to inform clinical decision making’ (Roland and Torgerson, 1998). In aid of this, pragmatic trials eliminate some of the exclusion conditions that are usual in what are labelled ‘ideal’ or ‘explanatory’ trials. The trouble comes with the concepts of ‘effectiveness’ and ‘external validity’. Positive results in well-conducted trials, whether ideal or pragmatic, show only that the treatment has worked for some members of the population enrolled in the trial. They cannot establish that it works in general nor what other factors help or hinder. Similarly, a pragmatic trial can establish that the treatment worked in the particular ‘real world’ setting – the one in which it was conducted, not that it works in ‘real world clinical practice’. Nor can they tell us what, if anything, is causally relevant in those settings. What can they do then? We shall argue that pragmatic trial results can be used in just the same way as ‘explanatory’ trial results: in tandem with a great deal of other evidence and theory, especial ‘midrange’ theory, to build credible local claims about how specific populations – or possibly even a specific individual – in specific places and circumstances may respond.
     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    27 January 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    Kendler, Kenneth S. (2012). “The dappled nature of causes of psychiatric illness: replacing the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy with empirically based pluralism”. Molecular Psychiatry 17, p. 377-388. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    3 February 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    Woodward, James (2008). “Cause and explanation in psychiatry: an interventionist perspective”. In K. S. Kendler & J. Parnas eds, Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    10 February 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Readings:

    • Bolton, Derek (2012). “Classification and causal mechanisms – a deflationary approach to the classification problem”. In K. S. Kendler & J. Parnas eds, Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry II: Nosology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    • First, Micheal B. (2012). “Comments: The National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project: moving towards a neuroscience-based diagnostic classification in psychiatry”. In K. S. Kendler & J. Parnas eds, Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry II: Nosology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.(link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    17 February 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Readings:

    • Cuthbert, Bruce N. (2014). “The RDoC framework: facilitating transition from ICD/DSM to dimensional approaches that integrate neuroscience and psychopathology”. World Psychiatry 13, p. 28-35. (link)
    • Kendler, Kenneth S. & Campbell, John (2009). “Interventionist causal models in psychiatry: repositioning the mind–body problem”. Psychological Medicine 39, p. 881-887. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    24 February 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    • Hoffman, Ginger A. & Zachar, Peter (2017). “RDoCʹs metaphysical assumptions: problems and promises”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Manic Temporality and Decision-Making: A Phenomenological Approach
    2 March 2017 - 17:00-18:30

    LectureWayne Martin, Department of Philosophy, University of Essex.

    Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus

    Abstract:

    The symptom scales and diagnostic criteria for mania are peppered with temporally inflected language: increased rate of speech, racing thoughts, flight of ideas, hyperactivity. But what is the underlying phenomenological structure of temporal experience in manic episodes? We identify a set of hypotheses about manic temporality formulated by two pioneers in 20th century clinical phenomenology: Eugène Minkowski (1885-1972) and Ludwig Binswanger (1881-1966). We then test, critique, and refine these hypothesis using methods of “second-person phenomenology” in an interview-based study of persons with a history of bipolar disorder and a current diagnosis of mania. We show that Minkowski and Binswanger were wrong to claim that persons experiencing acute mania are somehow trapped in the present moment. But we provide evidence that supports their hypothesis that disturbance in the formal structure of temporal experience is a core feature of mania. Developing a suggestion from Binswanger, we propose an interpretation of manic temporality as involving a distinctive form of protention. We identify consequences of this temporal disturbance for the assessment of decision-making capacity under conditions of mania.

    (See this event also on Facebook)
     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    3 March 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    • Kostko, Aaron & Bickle, John (2017). “Personalized psychiatry and scientific causal explanations: two accounts”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    10 March 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    • Campbell, John (2009). “What does rationality have to do with psychological causation? Propositional attitudes as mechanisms and as control variables”. In Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical perspectives, ed. M. Broome & Lisa Bortolotti. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Privacy, consent and health data: using identifiable health data for secondary purposes ethically, but without consent
    16 March 2017 - 17:00-18:30

    LectureJames Wilson, Department of Philosophy, UCL

    Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus

    (See this event also on Facebook)

    Abstract:

    A number legal regimes (e.g. England’s section 251 of the NHS Act 2006), have a mechanism that allows research involving identifiable health information to proceed without consent for a large population on grounds of the impracticability of gaining consent, even though the same research project would require the consent of all participants were the number of participants significantly smaller. This paper examines the cogency of the reasoning involved in such decisions, arguing that it seems difficult to justify on the assumption that in usual circumstances individuals have a right that their identifiable health information not be used without their consent. If using someone’s identifiable information without their consent would violate their rights if they were a member of a small group, why should it stop being a violation of that person’s rights if the group they are in becomes sufficiently large? I propose instead a new ethical justification for such use of health data, which I call the reasonable trespass account.


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    17 March 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    • Cratsley, Kelso (2017). “The shift to mechanistic explanation and classification”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    24 March 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    • Bolton, Derek (2008). “The epistemology of randomized, controlled trials and application in psychiatry”. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15, p. 159-165. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


    Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
    31 March 2017 - 16:00-17:00

    Reading:

    • Bolton, Derek (1997). “Encoding of meaning: deconstructing the meaning/causality distinction”. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4, p. 255-267. (link)

    Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

    Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

    The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

    Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

     


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