Events Overview

Past Events

Privacy, consent and health data: using identifiable health data for secondary purposes ethically, but without consent
16 March 2017 – 17:00-18:30

LectureJames Wilson, Department of Philosophy, UCL

Video Recording

(See this event also on Facebook)

Abstract:

A number legal regimes (e.g. England’s section 251 of the NHS Act 2006), have a mechanism that allows research involving identifiable health information to proceed without consent for a large population on grounds of the impracticability of gaining consent, even though the same research project would require the consent of all participants were the number of participants significantly smaller. This paper examines the cogency of the reasoning involved in such decisions, arguing that it seems difficult to justify on the assumption that in usual circumstances individuals have a right that their identifiable health information not be used without their consent. If using someone’s identifiable information without their consent would violate their rights if they were a member of a small group, why should it stop being a violation of that person’s rights if the group they are in becomes sufficiently large? I propose instead a new ethical justification for such use of health data, which I call the reasonable trespass account.

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
10 March 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Campbell, John (2009). “What does rationality have to do with psychological causation? Propositional attitudes as mechanisms and as control variables”. In Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical perspectives, ed. M. Broome & Lisa Bortolotti. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
3 March 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Kostko, Aaron & Bickle, John (2017). “Personalized psychiatry and scientific causal explanations: two accounts”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Manic Temporality and Decision-Making: A Phenomenological Approach
2 March 2017 – 17:00-18:30

LectureWayne Martin, Department of Philosophy, University of Essex.

Video Recording

Abstract:

The symptom scales and diagnostic criteria for mania are peppered with temporally inflected language: increased rate of speech, racing thoughts, flight of ideas, hyperactivity. But what is the underlying phenomenological structure of temporal experience in manic episodes? We identify a set of hypotheses about manic temporality formulated by two pioneers in 20th century clinical phenomenology: Eugène Minkowski (1885-1972) and Ludwig Binswanger (1881-1966). We then test, critique, and refine these hypothesis using methods of “second-person phenomenology” in an interview-based study of persons with a history of bipolar disorder and a current diagnosis of mania. We show that Minkowski and Binswanger were wrong to claim that persons experiencing acute mania are somehow trapped in the present moment. But we provide evidence that supports their hypothesis that disturbance in the formal structure of temporal experience is a core feature of mania. Developing a suggestion from Binswanger, we propose an interpretation of manic temporality as involving a distinctive form of protention. We identify consequences of this temporal disturbance for the assessment of decision-making capacity under conditions of mania.

(See this event also on Facebook)
 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
24 February 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Hoffman, Ginger A. & Zachar, Peter (2017). “RDoCʹs metaphysical assumptions: problems and promises”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
17 February 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Readings:

  • Cuthbert, Bruce N. (2014). “The RDoC framework: facilitating transition from ICD/DSM to dimensional approaches that integrate neuroscience and psychopathology”. World Psychiatry 13, p. 28-35. (link)
  • Kendler, Kenneth S. & Campbell, John (2009). “Interventionist causal models in psychiatry: repositioning the mind–body problem”. Psychological Medicine 39, p. 881-887. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
10 February 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Readings:

  • Bolton, Derek (2012). “Classification and causal mechanisms – a deflationary approach to the classification problem”. In K. S. Kendler & J. Parnas eds, Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry II: Nosology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • First, Micheal B. (2012). “Comments: The National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project: moving towards a neuroscience-based diagnostic classification in psychiatry”. In K. S. Kendler & J. Parnas eds, Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry II: Nosology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.(link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
3 February 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

Woodward, James (2008). “Cause and explanation in psychiatry: an interventionist perspective”. In K. S. Kendler & J. Parnas eds, Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
27 January 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

Kendler, Kenneth S. (2012). “The dappled nature of causes of psychiatric illness: replacing the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy with empirically based pluralism”. Molecular Psychiatry 17, p. 377-388. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

What's wrong with pragmatic trials?
26 January 2017 – 17:00-18:30

LectureNancy Cartwright, University of Durham and University of California, San Diego (Work with Sarah Wieten)

Video Recording

(See this event also on Facebook)
 

Abstract:

In principle nothing is wrong with pragmatic trials: trials that ‘seek to determine the effectiveness of an intervention in a real-world setting to inform clinical decision making’ (Roland and Torgerson, 1998). In aid of this, pragmatic trials eliminate some of the exclusion conditions that are usual in what are labelled ‘ideal’ or ‘explanatory’ trials. The trouble comes with the concepts of ‘effectiveness’ and ‘external validity’. Positive results in well-conducted trials, whether ideal or pragmatic, show only that the treatment has worked for some members of the population enrolled in the trial. They cannot establish that it works in general nor what other factors help or hinder. Similarly, a pragmatic trial can establish that the treatment worked in the particular ‘real world’ setting – the one in which it was conducted, not that it works in ‘real world clinical practice’. Nor can they tell us what, if anything, is causally relevant in those settings. What can they do then? We shall argue that pragmatic trial results can be used in just the same way as ‘explanatory’ trial results: in tandem with a great deal of other evidence and theory, especial ‘midrange’ theory, to build credible local claims about how specific populations – or possibly even a specific individual – in specific places and circumstances may respond.
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10