Events Overview

Colloquium on Ethics: Riana Betzler and David Fajardo Chica (online)
22 October 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Riana Betzler (WUSTL): Ethics as a Practice in Medical Education
David Fajardo Chica (UNAM): Pain, suffering and death: A proposal for philosophy in palliative care education

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22nd October)

Riana Betzler is McDonnell Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology in the Department of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research spans the philosophy of biology, psychology and medicine including the ethics of empathy.

David Fajardo Chica is a postdoctoral researcher in philosophy based in the Faculty of Medicine at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. His research concerns pain and suffering in palliative care.

Colloquium on Phenomenology: Anthony Vincent Fernandez and Samantha Gallivan (online)
12 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Anthony Vincent Fernandez (KSU): Teaching Phenomenology in Clinical Practice: A Conceptual Approach
Samantha Gallivan (Imperial): Using Phenomenologically Informed Qualitative Methods to Explore Surgical Practice

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22th November)

Anthony Vincent Fernandez is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Kent State University. His current research concerns the challenges of applying phenomenology to domains for which it was not intended such as psychology, medicine, race and gender.

Samantha Gallivan is an orthopaedic surgeon with St George’s Hospital and Deputy Academic Lead for Collaborative Projects at Imperial College London. Her research focuses on understanding tacit and embodied knowing in the expert practice of surgeons, stone carvers and sculptors.

Colloquium on Psychiatry: Benjamin Wilck, Ivan Nenchev and Tania Gergel (online)
26 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt) and Ivan Nenchev (Charité): The Value of Philosophy of Language for Psychiatric Diagnostics
Tania Gergel (KCL): Teaching philosophy to psychiatrists: a paradigm case of interdisciplinary education?

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 26th November)

Ivan Nenchev is Resident Physician and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and Benjamin Wilck is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Philosophy at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Tania Gergel is a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Psychological Medicine at King’s College London. Her research focuses on applying conceptual analysis to mental health, psychiatry and law.

Past Events

Peter Sowerby Interdisciplinary Workshop
6 November 2019 - 7 November 2019 – 10:30-16:45

The Brain

Conceptual Issues in Biological Psychiatry

6-7 November

Location:
Bedford Room (Ground Floor)
Senate House
University of London
Malet Street
WC1E 7HU
London

Registration: This event is now fully booked. If you’d like to be put on a waiting list send an email containing your full name to Harriet Fagerberg (harriet.fagerberg@kcl.ac.uk) with ‘Sowerby Biological Psychiatry Waiting List’ in the subject line.

Programme

6th of November

  • 10:30 – 11:00 Registration
  • 11:00 – 11:15 Welcome
  • 11:15 – 12:15 Gareth Owen (KCL) – Psychiatry: neurology, psychology or social work?
  • 12:15 – 12:30 Break
  • 12:30 – 13:30 Vaughan Bell (UCL) and Monica Greco (Goldsmiths) – The Functional/Organic distinction in neurology and psychiatry: a multiplicity of uses
  • 13:30 – 14:15 Lunch
  • 14:15 – 15:15 Anna Daniels (Charité) – A claim for integrated dimensional psychiatry
  • 15:15 – 15:45 Break
  • 15:45 – 16:45 Mohammed Rashed (Birkbeck) – Madness and the limits of social recognition

7th of November

  • 09:45 – 10:00 Coffee
  • 10:00 – 11:00 Matthew Parrott (Oxford) – Intelligibility and mechanistic explanations
  • 11:00 – 11:15 Break
  • 11:15 – 12:15 Daniel Williams (Cambridge) – Predictive processing in psychiatry – a critique
  • 12:15 – 12:30 Break
  • 12:30 – 13:30 Henrik Walter (Charité) – Network theory of mental disorder and the new mechanism: Moving forward
  • 13:30 – 14:15 Lunch
  • 14:15 – 15:15 Kari Theurer (Trinity College) and Daniel Hartner (Rose-Hulman) – A critique of psychiatry’s turn towards precision medicine
  • 15:15 – 15:45 Break
  • 15:45 – 16:45 Rachel Cooper (Lancaster) – Ongoing problems for naturalistic accounts of mental disorder


General inquires can be directed to the organisers: Harriet Fagerberg (harriet.fagerberg@kcl.ac.uk) and Anneli Jefferson (anneli.1.jefferson@kcl.ac.uk).

Applications of the updated the Biopsychosocial Model (II): Theorising biomedicaly hard to reach conditions
31 October 2019 – 17:00-18:30

Lecture: Derek Bolton, King’s College London

Lecture Theatre 2, New Hunts House, Guy’s Campus

Registration: Eventbrite (only required for attendees without a valid KCL ID)

(See this event also on Facebook)

Audio Recording

Description:

As set up here (as by Engel) biopsychosocial medicine would help itself to biomedicine – but add some – psychosocial factors – into the mix. Biomedicine manages some conditions at some stages very well by itself. But there is a long list of high service demand conditions/stages/complaints for which this is probably not the case. Examples were referred to in the first lecture, and include aetiology of many conditions – as last week. Also includes management of LTCs. Also includes pain and distress and activity limitations that have no biomedically detectable cause and which have – as is increasingly realised – central nervous system involvement. The updated BPSM would link biomedical science (biology below the neck) with neuroscience (biopsychology above the neck) – interacting with social task demands and resources.

Part 4 of 4 in the series

The Biopsychosocial Model: Updating the Model in Response to Major criticisms“.

Led by Derek Bolton, Professor of Philosophy & Psychopathology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, until recently Honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist in SL&M. He has published widely in health sciences and philosophy of psychiatry and medicine. His latest book, co-authored with Professor Grant Gillett (philosopher and formerly neurosurgeon) at Otago, is The Biopsychosocial Model of Health and Disease: New Philosophical and Scientific Developments, published OPEN ACCESS by Springer Palgrave. These lectures will review and apply the main ideas of the book, adapted for health students and educators and interested clinicians.

 

Applications of the updated the Biopsychosocial Model (I): Theorising the social gradient in health
24 October 2019 – 17:00-18:30

Lecture: Derek Bolton, King’s College London

Lecture Theatre 2, New Hunts House, Guy’s Campus, King’s College London

Registration: Eventbrite (only required for attendees without a valid KCL ID)

(See this event also on Facebook)

Lecture Slides
Audio Recording

Description:

The Marmot Review of health inequalities “does not have much medicine in it”. Meaning: the aetiological risks for many kinds of health condition & implications for prevention targets are social and psychological – as well as biological. How e.g. can lower (perceived) social status make you sick? These issues will be tackled using the updated biopsychosocial model outlined in the previous lecture. We will note that the familiar current hypothesised stress-related mechanisms are thoroughly biopsychosocial.

Part 3 of 4 in the series

The Biopsychosocial Model: Updating the Model in Response to Major criticisms“.

Led by Derek Bolton, Professor of Philosophy & Psychopathology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, until recently Honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist in SL&M. He has published widely in health sciences and philosophy of psychiatry and medicine. His latest book, co-authored with Professor Grant Gillett (philosopher and formerly neurosurgeon) at Otago, is The Biopsychosocial Model of Health and Disease: New Philosophical and Scientific Developments, published OPEN ACCESS by Springer Palgrave. These lectures will review and apply the main ideas of the book, adapted for health students and educators and interested clinicians.

 

The Biopsychosocial Model as a model of biopsychosocial causal interactions
17 October 2019 – 17:00-18:30

Lecture: Derek Bolton, King’s College London

Harris Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus, King’s College London

Registration: Eventbrite (only required for attendees without a valid KCL ID)

(See this event also on Facebook)

Lecture Slides
Audio Recording

Description:

When George Engel proposed the BPSM – way back in 1977 – he realised that a lot of prejudice had to be overcome to let in psychological and social processes as causal factors. They included physicalism, reductionism, the view that biology was reducible to physics & chemistry, and mind/body dualism. These are deep science theory issues bordering into philosophy. However, current critical commentators in health agree with Engel that for the BPSM to be feasible, these assumptions will need to be ditched & replaced. I propose a way of doing this using current paradigms in biology (crucial role of regulatory mechanisms) and psychology (embodied cognition as agency) + some political philosophy (autonomy & recognition).

Part 2 of 4 in the series

The Biopsychosocial Model: Updating the Model in Response to Major criticisms“.

Led by Derek Bolton, Professor of Philosophy & Psychopathology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, until recently Honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist in SL&M. He has published widely in health sciences and philosophy of psychiatry and medicine. His latest book, co-authored with Professor Grant Gillett (philosopher and formerly neurosurgeon) at Otago, is The Biopsychosocial Model of Health and Disease: New Philosophical and Scientific Developments, published OPEN ACCESS by Springer Palgrave. These lectures will review and apply the main ideas of the book, adapted for health students and educators and interested clinicians.

 

Radical criticisms of the Biopsychosocial Model, and why we still have it nevertheless
10 October 2019 – 17:00-18:30

Lecture: Derek Bolton, King’s College London

Harris Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus, King’s College London

Registration: Eventbrite (only required for attendees without a valid KCL ID)

(See this event also on Facebook)

Lecture Slides
Audio Recording

Description:

The BPSM has recently been radically criticised by authoritative commentators in e.g. The Lancet and the American Journal of Psychiatry; for being vague, lacking scientific content, useless and philosophically incoherent. This combined with the fact that the BPSM is still so frequently invoked in clinical and healthcare education settings signals a problem in the current conceptual foundations of medicine/healthcare. We keep invoking the BPSM because there is accumulating evidence that psychosocial factors as well as biological factors are relevant to many diseases and their management. Refers e.g. social epidemiology, management of LTCs. I will present the case that the ‘content’ of the BPSM/biopsychosocial medicine is to found in the specifics for particular conditions – in fact just like the content of the Biomedical Model/biomedicine is in its specifics.

Part 1 of 4 in the series

The Biopsychosocial Model: Updating the Model in Response to Major criticisms“.

Led by Derek Bolton, Professor of Philosophy & Psychopathology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, until recently Honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist in SL&M. He has published widely in health sciences and philosophy of psychiatry and medicine. His latest book, co-authored with Professor Grant Gillett (philosopher and formerly neurosurgeon) at Otago, is The Biopsychosocial Model of Health and Disease: New Philosophical and Scientific Developments, published OPEN ACCESS by Springer Palgrave. These lectures will review and apply the main ideas of the book, adapted for health students and educators and interested clinicians.

 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
12 July 2019 – 16:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Nahmias, Eddy; Allen, Corey & Loveall, Bradley (forthcoming). “When do robots have free will? Exploring the relationships between (attributions of) consciousness and free will”. ln B. Feltz, M. Missal & A.C. Sims eds, Free Will, Causality, and Neuroscience. Brill Publishers. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.
 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
5 July 2019 – 16:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Focquaert, Farah; Glenn, Andrea L. & Raine, Adrian (2015). “Psychopathy and free will from a philosophical and cognitive neuroscience perspective”. In W. Glannon ed., Free Will and the Brain: Neuroscientific, Philosophical, and Legal Perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.
 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
28 June 2019 – 16:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Meynen, Gerben (2012). “Obsessive-compulsive
    disorder, free will, and control”. Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 19, p. 323-332. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.
 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
21 June 2019 – 15:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Bolton, Derek & Gillett, Grant (2019). “Biology involves regulatory control of physical–chemical energetic processes”.(link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Derek will be joining us, so do come along to discuss the philosophical foundations of this updated version of the biopsychosocial model.

Location: Room 508

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.
 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
17 May 2019 – 17:00-19:00

Reading:

  • Maung, Hane H. (2019). “Dualism and its place in a philosophical structure for psychiatry”. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22, p. 59-69.(link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.
 

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