Events Overview

Colloquium on Ethics: Riana Betzler and David Fajardo Chica (online)
22 October 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Riana Betzler (WUSTL): Ethics as a Practice in Medical Education
David Fajardo Chica (UNAM): Pain, suffering and death: A proposal for philosophy in palliative care education

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22nd October)

Riana Betzler is McDonnell Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology in the Department of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research spans the philosophy of biology, psychology and medicine including the ethics of empathy.

David Fajardo Chica is a postdoctoral researcher in philosophy based in the Faculty of Medicine at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. His research concerns pain and suffering in palliative care.

Colloquium on Phenomenology: Anthony Vincent Fernandez and Samantha Gallivan (online)
12 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Anthony Vincent Fernandez (KSU): Teaching Phenomenology in Clinical Practice: A Conceptual Approach
Samantha Gallivan (Imperial): Using Phenomenologically Informed Qualitative Methods to Explore Surgical Practice

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22th November)

Anthony Vincent Fernandez is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Kent State University. His current research concerns the challenges of applying phenomenology to domains for which it was not intended such as psychology, medicine, race and gender.

Samantha Gallivan is an orthopaedic surgeon with St George’s Hospital and Deputy Academic Lead for Collaborative Projects at Imperial College London. Her research focuses on understanding tacit and embodied knowing in the expert practice of surgeons, stone carvers and sculptors.

Colloquium on Psychiatry: Benjamin Wilck, Ivan Nenchev and Tania Gergel (online)
26 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt) and Ivan Nenchev (Charité): The Value of Philosophy of Language for Psychiatric Diagnostics
Tania Gergel (KCL): Teaching philosophy to psychiatrists: a paradigm case of interdisciplinary education?

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 26th November)

Ivan Nenchev is Resident Physician and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and Benjamin Wilck is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Philosophy at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Tania Gergel is a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Psychological Medicine at King’s College London. Her research focuses on applying conceptual analysis to mental health, psychiatry and law.

Past Events

2018 Annual Sowerby Lecture
13 November 2018 – 19:30-21:00

Reflections on why I want what I want from research and researchers — as a patient

Lecture: Sir Iain Chalmers

Theatre 2, New Hunt’s House, KCL Guy’s Campus

Video Recording

See this event also on Facebook.

 

Abstract:

A quarter of a century ago, I decided to ask myself what I wanted—as a patient—from health research and researchers. In a BMJ paper I stated that I wanted decisions about my health care to be informed by ‘reliable evidence’. I also noted that people are bound to vary in what they regard as ‘reliable evidence’, and that a leap of faith would anyway always be needed in judging what the effects of health care options would be for me, as an individual. But I also made clear that, for me, ‘reliable evidence’ would usually mean evidence derived from systematic reviews of carefully controlled evaluative research, assembled with an awareness of the ways in which biases and the play of chance can play us false.

I suggested in the paper that there had been too little support for the kind of applied health research that I felt I needed to inform my health care choices. And I gave examples of the damaging consequences that can result from insufficient attention to reducing the effects of biases and the play of chance.

My lecture will revisit the themes I addressed 25 years ago and reflect on why—as a patient—I still want what I wanted from research and researchers quarter of a century ago.

 

About the Speaker:

Iain Chalmers was founding director of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (www.npeu.ox.ac.uk) between 1978 and 1992, and founding director of the UK Cochrane Centre (www.uk.cochrane.org) between 1992 and 2002. Since 2003, he has coordinated the James Lind Initiative, which developed the James Lind Alliance between 2004 and 2013 (www.jla.nihr.ac.uk). Iain edits The James Lind Library (www.jameslindlibrary.org) and Testing Treatments international English (www.en.testingtreatments.org); he co-organised with Paul Glasziou the 2014 Lancet series on reducing waste and adding value in biomedical research (www.rewardalliance.net); and he is a co-investigator with Andy Oxman and colleagues in Norway and East Africa of the Informed Health Choices Project (www.informedhealthchoices.org).

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
9 November 2018 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Gamma, Alex (2013). “The role of genetic information in personalized medicine”. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56, p. 485-512. (link) – if you have trouble accessing the paper, contact Tuomas: tuomas.pernu@kcl.ac.uk

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

 

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Understanding our ordinary thought and talk about chronic pain
8 November 2018 – 12:30-14:00

Lecture: Emma Borg, University of Reading

Classroom 6, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus – please note the unusual time.

(See this event also on Facebook)

Video Recording

 

Please note that any external attendees, i.e. those not currently holding a valid King’s ID card, will need to send their names to Harriet Fagerberg (harriet.fagerberg@kcl.ac.uk) prior to the 6th of November, so that she can notify King’s Estate Security.

 

Abstract:

Pain has a long history of study, from both the philosophical and the scientific perspectives, yet the question of what pain is, and how we conceive of and communicate about it, remains vexed. In this talk, we introduce a new approach to understanding our ordinary thought and talk about (chronic) pain – the so-called ‘polyeidic’ approach – whereby pain thinking is held to involve tacit stances on a number of distinct pain dimensions. We argue briefly that this approach is supported by experimental findings in philosophy and then turn to consider the clinical relevance of the view, suggesting that it provides a better understanding of chronic pain patients and the treatments from which they may benefit.

 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
2 November 2018 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Gamma, Alex (2017). “Personalized and precision medicine”. In M. Solomon, J.R. Simon & H. Kincaid eds, The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine. New York, NY: Routledge (link) – if you have trouble accessing the paper, contact Tuomas: tuomas.pernu@kcl.ac.uk

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

 

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
29 June 2018 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Blakey, Robert & Kremsmayer, Tobias P. (2018). “Unable or unwilling to exercise self-control? The impact of neuroscience on perceptions of impulsive offenders”. Frontiers in Psychology 8:2189. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Meeting at: Camden Town tube station

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Workshop on the Replication Crisis in Biomedicine
14 June 2018 – 13:30-18:00


Verena Heise (Oxford)

Robust Research – Progress, pitfalls and promise

How do we respond to the reproducibility crisis in academia? How do we respond to the people who have had enough of experts? And what does this have to do with the Cambridge Analytica scandal? In this talk I will focus on some practical solutions such as open science and good research practices that can help make our research findings more robust. While there are a number of solutions that can be implemented by individual researchers, there are wider issues, for example around incentives and skills training, that require cultural change. To this end we have started the Robust Research Initiative at the University of Oxford, which is mostly driven by early career researchers. I will give an overview of our current activities and the pitfalls and promise associated with developing robust research strategies.

 

Chris Chambers (Cardiff)

Registered Reports, five years on: A vaccine against bias in research and publishing

In 2013, Cortex became the first journal to offer Registered Reports, a format of preregistered empirical publication in which peer review happens prior to data collection and analysis (see https://cos.io/rr/). The aim of Registered Reports is to overcome publication bias and various forms of researcher bias (e.g. selective reporting of statistically significant results and hindsight bias), by performing peer review in part before studies commence. Publishability is then decided by the importance of the research question and quality of the methodology, and never based on the results of hypothesis testing. In this talk I will introduce the concept of Registered Reports and provide an update on its progress at at Cortex and beyond, including its uptake by prominent journals such as Nature Human Behaviour, generalist journals including Royal Society Open Science, and emerging clinical trial formats. I will also discuss preliminary evidence of impacts on the field and emerging Registered Report funding models in which journals and funders simultaneously assess proposed protocols. Together with allied initiatives, Registered Reports are helping to reshape the incentive structure of the life and social sciences to place theory, transparency and reproducibility at the fore.
 

Marcus Munafò (Bristol)

Scientific Ecosystems and Research Reproducibility

There have been a number of high profile cases of academic fraud, but a more insidious threat to the integrity of science is the extent to which distortions of scientific best practice increases the likelihood that published research findings are in fact false. There is growing evidence for a range of systemic problems within science, such as flexibility in the analysis of data, selective reporting of study results, publication bias against null results, influence of vested (e.g., financial) interests, and distorted incentive structures. A number of strategies for improving the situation will be discussed.

 

Attendance:

All are welcome! If you would like to come but do not have a King’s/GKT identity card, please let me know so that I can inform security at New Hunt’s House. Email: alexander.bird@kcl.ac.uk

(See this event also on Facebook)
 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
27 April 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Greene, Joshua & Cohen, Jonathan (2004). “For the law, neuroscience changes nothing and everything”. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359, p. 1775-1785. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Is Suicide a Psychiatric Problem?
24 April 2018 – 13:00-14:30

Lecture: Hane Maung, Lancaster University

Room 4.16 Henriette Raphael House, Guy’s Campus

(See this event also on Facebook)

Video Recording

Abstract:

Suicide is understood as being a complex outcome of multiple interacting factors at multiple levels of organisation, including diverse processes at individual, interpersonal, and environmental levels. Despite this complexity, suicide is commonly framed in contemporary health discourse as primarily being the causal outcome of mental disorder. Accordingly, mental health professionals are granted responsibilities for suicide prevention and can even be held legally liable when suicides occur. This selective emphasis on mental disorder raises philosophical problems. How do we make sense of the messy and murky interactions of factors that are involved in suicide causation? What accounts for our privileging of mental disorder over other factors as the primary cause of suicide? Is the connection between mental disorder and suicide wholly causal or partly the result of how mental disorder is defined? These questions are important, because they call attention to implicit assumptions involved in the way the issue of suicide causation is framed in contemporary health policy. In this talk, I draw on theory from the philosophy of science to unpack some of these assumptions and to explore the extent to which the contemporary view of suicide as being primarily a causal outcome of mental disorder can be sustained.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
20 April 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Wasserman, David & Johnston, Josephine (2014). “Seeing responsibility: can neuroimaging teach us anything about moral and legal responsibility?”. The Hastings Center Report 44, p. S37-S49. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
13 April 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Meynen, Gerben (2010). “Free will and mental disorder: exploring the relationship”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31, p. 429-443. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

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