Events Overview

Past Events

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
30 November 2018 – 17:00-19:00

Reading:

  • Felthous, Alan R. (2008). “The will: from metaphysical freedom to normative functionalism”. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law 36, p. 16-24.(link) – if you have trouble accessing the paper, contact Tuomas: tuomas.pernu@kcl.ac.uk

Anneli (the author of the paper) will be joining us.

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

 

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Sharing Personal Stories in Mental Health Debates
29 November 2018 – 17:00-18:30

Lecture: Lisa Bortolotti, University of Birmingham

Classroom 12, Hodgkin Building at Guy’s Campus

Those not holding a valid King’s ID card can register by emailing Harriet Fagerberg their name prior to the 28th of Nov.

(See this event also on Facebook)

Video Recording

Abstract:

In this paper I consider the use of personally significant stories in public debates about mental health. I offer one example: the debate whether the biomedical model or the trauma-informed approach provides the best account of distress, revived by the launch of the Power Threat Meaning framework. First, I observe how personally significant stories are used and claim that they do not merely offer insight into a first-person experience or illustrate some aspects of distress and autism in a vivid and memorable way, but often constitute arguments for a given viewpoint in the context of heated and polarised debates. Then, I ask what it would take for stories to be good arguments for the viewpoint they support. In the end, I suggest that participants in a public debate have a responsibility to maintain some critical distance from the personally significant stories that are shared within that debate, as such stories can have a powerful influence on the development and outcome of the debate.
 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
23 November 2018 – 17:00-19:00

Reading:

  • Jefferson, Anneli (forthcoming). “What does it take to be a brain disorder?”. Synthese.(link) – if you have trouble accessing the paper, contact Tuomas: tuomas.pernu@kcl.ac.uk

Anneli (the author of the paper) will be joining us.

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

 

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

A Plurality During Pregnancy?
22 November 2018 – 17:00-18:30

Lecture: Jonathan Grose, University of Southampton

Strand Campus, Somerset House East Wing, Room SW-2.17

Those not holding a valid King’s ID card can register by emailing Harriet Fagerberg their name prior to the 21st of Nov.

(See this event also on Facebook)

Video Recording

Abstract:

I argue that the case of mammalian, placental pregnancy is a neglected and significant example of what Clarke calls “the problem of biological individuality”. This example is much closer to home than those typically discussed in the literature. I apply both evolutionary and immunological accounts of individuality to the “counting question”, how many individuals are present during a placental pregnancy? I conclude that evolutionary approaches yield the answer “two”, due to bottlenecking, germ-soma sequestration and sexual recombination. By contrast, an immunological approach answers “one”, due to pervasive interactions during pregnancy. Consequently, pregnancy provides a clear, novel example of the need for a pluralist approach to biological individuality.

 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
16 November 2018 – 17:00-19:00

Reading:

  • Furman, Katherine (forthcoming). “Mono-causal and multi-causal theories of disease: how to think virally and socially about the aetiology of AIDS”. Journal of Medical Humanities. (link) – if you have trouble accessing the paper, contact Tuomas: tuomas.pernu@kcl.ac.uk

Katherine (the author of the paper) will be present too, so do join us in discussing the aetiology of AIDS and causal explanation in medicine – everybody’s welcome!

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

 

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

2018 Annual Sowerby Lecture
13 November 2018 – 19:30-21:00

Reflections on why I want what I want from research and researchers — as a patient

Lecture: Sir Iain Chalmers

Theatre 2, New Hunt’s House, KCL Guy’s Campus

Video Recording

See this event also on Facebook.

 

Abstract:

A quarter of a century ago, I decided to ask myself what I wanted—as a patient—from health research and researchers. In a BMJ paper I stated that I wanted decisions about my health care to be informed by ‘reliable evidence’. I also noted that people are bound to vary in what they regard as ‘reliable evidence’, and that a leap of faith would anyway always be needed in judging what the effects of health care options would be for me, as an individual. But I also made clear that, for me, ‘reliable evidence’ would usually mean evidence derived from systematic reviews of carefully controlled evaluative research, assembled with an awareness of the ways in which biases and the play of chance can play us false.

I suggested in the paper that there had been too little support for the kind of applied health research that I felt I needed to inform my health care choices. And I gave examples of the damaging consequences that can result from insufficient attention to reducing the effects of biases and the play of chance.

My lecture will revisit the themes I addressed 25 years ago and reflect on why—as a patient—I still want what I wanted from research and researchers quarter of a century ago.

 

About the Speaker:

Iain Chalmers was founding director of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (www.npeu.ox.ac.uk) between 1978 and 1992, and founding director of the UK Cochrane Centre (www.uk.cochrane.org) between 1992 and 2002. Since 2003, he has coordinated the James Lind Initiative, which developed the James Lind Alliance between 2004 and 2013 (www.jla.nihr.ac.uk). Iain edits The James Lind Library (www.jameslindlibrary.org) and Testing Treatments international English (www.en.testingtreatments.org); he co-organised with Paul Glasziou the 2014 Lancet series on reducing waste and adding value in biomedical research (www.rewardalliance.net); and he is a co-investigator with Andy Oxman and colleagues in Norway and East Africa of the Informed Health Choices Project (www.informedhealthchoices.org).

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
9 November 2018 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Gamma, Alex (2013). “The role of genetic information in personalized medicine”. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56, p. 485-512. (link) – if you have trouble accessing the paper, contact Tuomas: tuomas.pernu@kcl.ac.uk

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

 

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Understanding our ordinary thought and talk about chronic pain
8 November 2018 – 12:30-14:00

Lecture: Emma Borg, University of Reading

Classroom 6, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus – please note the unusual time.

(See this event also on Facebook)

Video Recording

 

Please note that any external attendees, i.e. those not currently holding a valid King’s ID card, will need to send their names to Harriet Fagerberg (harriet.fagerberg@kcl.ac.uk) prior to the 6th of November, so that she can notify King’s Estate Security.

 

Abstract:

Pain has a long history of study, from both the philosophical and the scientific perspectives, yet the question of what pain is, and how we conceive of and communicate about it, remains vexed. In this talk, we introduce a new approach to understanding our ordinary thought and talk about (chronic) pain – the so-called ‘polyeidic’ approach – whereby pain thinking is held to involve tacit stances on a number of distinct pain dimensions. We argue briefly that this approach is supported by experimental findings in philosophy and then turn to consider the clinical relevance of the view, suggesting that it provides a better understanding of chronic pain patients and the treatments from which they may benefit.

 

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
2 November 2018 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Gamma, Alex (2017). “Personalized and precision medicine”. In M. Solomon, J.R. Simon & H. Kincaid eds, The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine. New York, NY: Routledge (link) – if you have trouble accessing the paper, contact Tuomas: tuomas.pernu@kcl.ac.uk

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Location: Room 508

 

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, this term with a special focus on personalised medicine. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
29 June 2018 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Blakey, Robert & Kremsmayer, Tobias P. (2018). “Unable or unwilling to exercise self-control? The impact of neuroscience on perceptions of impulsive offenders”. Frontiers in Psychology 8:2189. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Meeting at: Camden Town tube station

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10