Events Overview

Past Events

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
2 March 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • TBA

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
23 February 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • TBA

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
16 February 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Wakefield, Jerome C. & First, Michael B. (2012). “Placing symptoms in context: the role of contextual criteria in reducing false positives in DSM diagnosis”. Comprehensive Psychiatry 53, p. 130–139. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Manufactured Values: Industry Front Groups, Looping Effects, and Regulatory Decisions
13 February 2018 – 17:00-18:30

LectureBennett Holman, University of Yonsei.

Classroom 6, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus

(See this event also on Facebook)
 

Abstract:

Evaluating a case to determine whether it is an example of overtreatment frequently
trades on values: “Which side effects are important enough to include in any measurement of
harm? Are some side effects more important than others? Who should decide—patients,
clinicians, or researchers? And what if they disagree?” (Carter et al. 2015). In an effort to deal
with just this issue, the FDA created the patient focus drug program. Combining philosophy
with qualitative methods from the social sciences, our research first examines the October
2014 patient meeting for Flibanserin and female sexual dysfunction. We show that industry-
funded participants presented a unified message that was almost completely distinct from
other participants. We argue that this process can be understood as an example of a “looping
effect” (i.e. women have internalized the industry’s narrative which now genuinely structures
their experience). Setting this case in context of broader efforts by industry to shape the
experience of patient groups, we argue that: At best this significantly complicates efforts to
incorporate patient values into risk/benefit judgments, and at worst, it belies the
presupposition that patient interests are an objective, immutable, and knowable factor to be
incorporated into medical decision making and regulatory decisions.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
9 February 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Wakefield, Jerome C. (2017). “Addiction and the concept of disorder, part 1: why addiction is a medical disorder”. Neuroethics 10, p. 39-53. (link)
  • Lewis, Marc (2017). “What Evolution Intended? Reply to Wakefield”. Neuroethics 10, p. 69-70. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Too much medicine: Not enough trust?
6 February 2018 – 17:00-18:30

LectureZoë Fritz and Richard Holton, University of Cambridge.

G.12 New Hunt’s House, Guy’s Campus

(See this event also on Facebook)
 

Abstract:

We suggest that ‘too much medicine’, in the shape of both investigations and
treatments, is sometimes offered as a substitute for a trusting relationship. We investigate the
nature of such a relationship, arguing that at its core it involves a transfer of discretion. We
show that there is substantial empirical support for the idea that more trust will reduce the
problem of too much medicine. We then investigate ways in which trust can be built quickly,
concentrating on issues of questioning, and of entrusting uncertainty and treatment. We
conclude by suggesting that using over-treatment as a way of generating trust may itself be an
untrustworthy way of proceeding.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
2 February 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Borsboom, Denny; Cramer, Angélique & Kalis, Annemarie (forthcoming). “Brain disorders? Not really … Why network structures block reductionism in psychopathology research”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
26 January 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
15 December 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Ahmed, Serge H. (2010). “Validation crisis in animal models of drug addiction: beyond non-disordered drug use toward drug addiction”. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 35, p. 172-184. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
8 December 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Pickard, Hanna (2017). “Responsibility without blame for addiction”. Neuroethics 10, p. 169-180. (link)
  • Lewis, Marc (2017). “Choice isn’t simple. Reply to Pickard”. Neuroethics 10, p. 181-183. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

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