Events Overview

Colloquium on Ethics: Riana Betzler and David Fajardo Chica (online)
22 October 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Riana Betzler (WUSTL): Ethics as a Practice in Medical Education
David Fajardo Chica (UNAM): Pain, suffering and death: A proposal for philosophy in palliative care education

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22nd October)

Riana Betzler is McDonnell Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology in the Department of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research spans the philosophy of biology, psychology and medicine including the ethics of empathy.

David Fajardo Chica is a postdoctoral researcher in philosophy based in the Faculty of Medicine at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. His research concerns pain and suffering in palliative care.

Colloquium on Phenomenology: Anthony Vincent Fernandez and Samantha Gallivan (online)
12 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Anthony Vincent Fernandez (KSU): Teaching Phenomenology in Clinical Practice: A Conceptual Approach
Samantha Gallivan (Imperial): Using Phenomenologically Informed Qualitative Methods to Explore Surgical Practice

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22th November)

Anthony Vincent Fernandez is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Kent State University. His current research concerns the challenges of applying phenomenology to domains for which it was not intended such as psychology, medicine, race and gender.

Samantha Gallivan is an orthopaedic surgeon with St George’s Hospital and Deputy Academic Lead for Collaborative Projects at Imperial College London. Her research focuses on understanding tacit and embodied knowing in the expert practice of surgeons, stone carvers and sculptors.

Colloquium on Psychiatry: Benjamin Wilck, Ivan Nenchev and Tania Gergel (online)
26 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt) and Ivan Nenchev (Charité): The Value of Philosophy of Language for Psychiatric Diagnostics
Tania Gergel (KCL): Teaching philosophy to psychiatrists: a paradigm case of interdisciplinary education?

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 26th November)

Ivan Nenchev is Resident Physician and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and Benjamin Wilck is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Philosophy at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Tania Gergel is a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Psychological Medicine at King’s College London. Her research focuses on applying conceptual analysis to mental health, psychiatry and law.

Past Events

Too much medicine: Not enough trust?
6 February 2018 – 17:00-18:30

LectureZoë Fritz and Richard Holton, University of Cambridge.

G.12 New Hunt’s House, Guy’s Campus

(See this event also on Facebook)
 

Abstract:

We suggest that ‘too much medicine’, in the shape of both investigations and
treatments, is sometimes offered as a substitute for a trusting relationship. We investigate the
nature of such a relationship, arguing that at its core it involves a transfer of discretion. We
show that there is substantial empirical support for the idea that more trust will reduce the
problem of too much medicine. We then investigate ways in which trust can be built quickly,
concentrating on issues of questioning, and of entrusting uncertainty and treatment. We
conclude by suggesting that using over-treatment as a way of generating trust may itself be an
untrustworthy way of proceeding.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
2 February 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

  • Borsboom, Denny; Cramer, Angélique & Kalis, Annemarie (forthcoming). “Brain disorders? Not really … Why network structures block reductionism in psychopathology research”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group
26 January 2018 – 17:00-18:00

Reading:

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
15 December 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Ahmed, Serge H. (2010). “Validation crisis in animal models of drug addiction: beyond non-disordered drug use toward drug addiction”. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 35, p. 172-184. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
8 December 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Pickard, Hanna (2017). “Responsibility without blame for addiction”. Neuroethics 10, p. 169-180. (link)
  • Lewis, Marc (2017). “Choice isn’t simple. Reply to Pickard”. Neuroethics 10, p. 181-183. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
1 December 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Hendem, Edmund & Gjelsvik, Olav (2017). “What Is wrong with the brains of addicts?”. Neuroethics 10, p. 71-78. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London – we will be meeting in the Common Room and then we will look for a free room in the building.

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
17 November 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Calvey, Tanya (2017). “The extended evolutionary synthesis and addiction: the price we pay for adaptability”. Progress in Brain Research 235, p. 1-18. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508 (typically), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
10 November 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Brooks, Samantha J.; Lochner, Christine; Shoptaw, Steve Shoptaw & Stein, Dan J. (2017). “Using the research domain criteria (RDoC) to conceptualize impulsivity and compulsivity in relation to addiction”. Progress in Brain Research 235, p. 177-218. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 508, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

2017 Annual Sowerby Lecture
9 November 2017 – 19:30-21:00

Mental Health and Justice: Classical and Romantic perspectives

Lecture: Gareth Owen – King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience

See this event also on Facebook.

Video Recording

Abstract:

Psychiatry has long attracted interpretations from cool, detached perspectives valuing objectivity (Kraepelin, Freud, Beck) to hotter, embodied perspectives valuing subjectivity (Reil, Laing, Foucault).

These two perspectives (‘classical’ and ‘romantic’) are now expressing themselves in psychiatry’s meeting point with law with different approaches taken to the decision-making of the mentally ill. A recent ‘classical’ achievement in this area is the Mental Capacity Act (2005) which lays out a test of decision-making capacity within a legal framework that has been described as “a masterpiece of legal clarity”. A recent romantic achievement has been the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which emphatically asserts a social model of mental illness in which society, not the brain, is the true source of disabilities.

This lecture will probe the subjectivity of some disorders of mind and brain. What, for example, is it like to be a decision-maker under conditions of brain injury unaware of one’s deficits or a person with affective disorder fluctuating between experiences of the future as intensely dark and intensely bright? And how should others respond? It aims to use these forms of human experience to challenge the single mindedness of both classical and romantic perspectives and draw out implications for psychiatry as a branch of medicine interacting with law and society.

 

About the Speaker:

Dr Gareth Owen leads the Wellcome Trust funded Mental Health and Justice Project – a collaborative research endeavour spanning psychiatry, law, ethics, neuroscience and social science/public policy. The project takes an interdisciplinary approach to the core dilemma of respecting vs. protecting the decision-making of people with mental disabilities or disorders. He did undergrad studies in physics, philosophy and medicine and post grad psychiatry training at the Maudsley.

Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group: Addiction
3 November 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter & Pickard, Hanna (2013). “What is addiction?”. In KWM Fulford & al. eds, The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry: Oxford: Oxford University Press. (link)

Convener: Tuomas Pernu

Room 608 (Graduate Common Room), Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10