Events Overview

Colloquium on Ethics: Riana Betzler and David Fajardo Chica (online)
22 October 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Riana Betzler (WUSTL): Ethics as a Practice in Medical Education
David Fajardo Chica (UNAM): Pain, suffering and death: A proposal for philosophy in palliative care education

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22nd October)

Riana Betzler is McDonnell Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology in the Department of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research spans the philosophy of biology, psychology and medicine including the ethics of empathy.

David Fajardo Chica is a postdoctoral researcher in philosophy based in the Faculty of Medicine at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. His research concerns pain and suffering in palliative care.

Colloquium on Phenomenology: Anthony Vincent Fernandez and Samantha Gallivan (online)
12 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Anthony Vincent Fernandez (KSU): Teaching Phenomenology in Clinical Practice: A Conceptual Approach
Samantha Gallivan (Imperial): Using Phenomenologically Informed Qualitative Methods to Explore Surgical Practice

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 22th November)

Anthony Vincent Fernandez is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Kent State University. His current research concerns the challenges of applying phenomenology to domains for which it was not intended such as psychology, medicine, race and gender.

Samantha Gallivan is an orthopaedic surgeon with St George’s Hospital and Deputy Academic Lead for Collaborative Projects at Imperial College London. Her research focuses on understanding tacit and embodied knowing in the expert practice of surgeons, stone carvers and sculptors.

Colloquium on Psychiatry: Benjamin Wilck, Ivan Nenchev and Tania Gergel (online)
26 November 2020 – 17:00-18:15

Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt) and Ivan Nenchev (Charité): The Value of Philosophy of Language for Psychiatric Diagnostics
Tania Gergel (KCL): Teaching philosophy to psychiatrists: a paradigm case of interdisciplinary education?

Place: Online Videoconference
Registration: via eventbrite (by 14 00 on the 26th November)

Ivan Nenchev is Resident Physician and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and Benjamin Wilck is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Philosophy at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Tania Gergel is a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Psychological Medicine at King’s College London. Her research focuses on applying conceptual analysis to mental health, psychiatry and law.

Past Events

Reading Group
21 April 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Fuller, Jonathan (forthcoming). “What are chronic diseases?”. Synthese. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu, plus presentation from Jonathan Fuller

Philosophy Department Seminar Room: PB405 (KCL, Strand, Philosophy Building, Ground Floor)

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
7 April 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Kendler, Kenneth S. & Campbell, John (2014). “Expanding the domain of the understandable in psychiatric illness: an updating of the Jasperian framework of explanation and understanding”. Psychological Medicine 44, p. 1-7. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
31 March 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Bolton, Derek (1997). “Encoding of meaning: deconstructing the meaning/causality distinction”. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4, p. 255-267. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
24 March 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Bolton, Derek (2008). “The epistemology of randomized, controlled trials and application in psychiatry”. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15, p. 159-165. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
17 March 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Cratsley, Kelso (2017). “The shift to mechanistic explanation and classification”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Privacy, consent and health data: using identifiable health data for secondary purposes ethically, but without consent
16 March 2017 – 17:00-18:30

LectureJames Wilson, Department of Philosophy, UCL

Video Recording

(See this event also on Facebook)

Abstract:

A number legal regimes (e.g. England’s section 251 of the NHS Act 2006), have a mechanism that allows research involving identifiable health information to proceed without consent for a large population on grounds of the impracticability of gaining consent, even though the same research project would require the consent of all participants were the number of participants significantly smaller. This paper examines the cogency of the reasoning involved in such decisions, arguing that it seems difficult to justify on the assumption that in usual circumstances individuals have a right that their identifiable health information not be used without their consent. If using someone’s identifiable information without their consent would violate their rights if they were a member of a small group, why should it stop being a violation of that person’s rights if the group they are in becomes sufficiently large? I propose instead a new ethical justification for such use of health data, which I call the reasonable trespass account.

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
10 March 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Campbell, John (2009). “What does rationality have to do with psychological causation? Propositional attitudes as mechanisms and as control variables”. In Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical perspectives, ed. M. Broome & Lisa Bortolotti. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
3 March 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Kostko, Aaron & Bickle, John (2017). “Personalized psychiatry and scientific causal explanations: two accounts”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

Manic Temporality and Decision-Making: A Phenomenological Approach
2 March 2017 – 17:00-18:30

LectureWayne Martin, Department of Philosophy, University of Essex.

Video Recording

Abstract:

The symptom scales and diagnostic criteria for mania are peppered with temporally inflected language: increased rate of speech, racing thoughts, flight of ideas, hyperactivity. But what is the underlying phenomenological structure of temporal experience in manic episodes? We identify a set of hypotheses about manic temporality formulated by two pioneers in 20th century clinical phenomenology: Eugène Minkowski (1885-1972) and Ludwig Binswanger (1881-1966). We then test, critique, and refine these hypothesis using methods of “second-person phenomenology” in an interview-based study of persons with a history of bipolar disorder and a current diagnosis of mania. We show that Minkowski and Binswanger were wrong to claim that persons experiencing acute mania are somehow trapped in the present moment. But we provide evidence that supports their hypothesis that disturbance in the formal structure of temporal experience is a core feature of mania. Developing a suggestion from Binswanger, we propose an interpretation of manic temporality as involving a distinctive form of protention. We identify consequences of this temporal disturbance for the assessment of decision-making capacity under conditions of mania.

(See this event also on Facebook)
 

Reading Group: Causal Explanation in Psychiatry
24 February 2017 – 16:00-17:00

Reading:

  • Hoffman, Ginger A. & Zachar, Peter (2017). “RDoCʹs metaphysical assumptions: problems and promises”. In J. Poland & Şerife Tekin eds, Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (link)

Convener: Dr Tuomas Pernu

Room 703, Philosophy Building, Strand, King’s College London

The Philosophy & Medicine Reading Group discusses topics at the intersection of philosophy and medicine, with a special focus on Causal Explanation in Psychiatry. We will base our discussion in each session on a paper. All members of the group are welcome to suggest relevant reading. Please do feel free to participate even if you have not been able to read the material or have missed a meeting. If you would like to suggest specific readings, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the group convener, Dr Tuomas Pernu by email.

Please also join us on Facebook. You are welcome to join this group as a virtual member even if you are unable to attend the actual meetings.

 

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